Dive Sites

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Being as our location is right square in the middle of some of the best diving the Florida Keys have to offer, you will have the pleasure of diving many popular reefs and wrecks from Islamorada to Key Largo! The list is long, but here are a few of our favorites.

Davis Reef

Davis Reef

(15-30 feet) Davis Reef is essentially a shallow ledge teeming with marine life from several resident green moray eels to many varieties of tropical fish. It is a favorite sleeping area for turtles and easy to navigate so it makes for excellent night dive

Pleasure Reef

Pleasure Reef

(25-30 feet) Pleasure Reef is just that, a pleasure! With literally clouds of colorful schooling fish, it is also a popular hang-out for nurse sharks, large schools of midnight parrot fish and eels.

Crocker Wall

Crocker Wall

(40-90 feet) Crocker wall is a gently sloping reef that bottoms out around 90 feet. It is the home to many barrel sponges, gorgonians, large coral heads and lots of tropical fish. You may even see a turtle or an eagle ray pass by.

Molasses Reef

Molasses Reef

(15-70 feet) The “Big Mo”. Probably one of the most famous reefs in the Keys. Located within the Coral Reef State Park,it’s a maze of coral channels and canyons that are populated with a wide diversity of marine life. Large pelagics, such as turtles and potted eagle rays are frequent visitors. This is arguably the most beautiful collection of reefs in all of Florida! Rather than a single site, Molasses is an extensive reef with a variety of depths. It is the home of "Fire Coral Caves", "The Winch Hole", "Eagle Ray Run" and "Spanish Anchor"

Snapper Ledge

Snapper Ledge

(18-25 feet) Extremely large schools of grunts, snappers tend to congregate year round what is known as Snapper Ledge. The other popular land mark on this site huge Brain Coral, in pristine condition, just off to the west side of the ledge. You are also likely to see nurse sharks, lobster, a few resident green moray eels, sting rays off in the sand and a wide variety of parrot fish.

Pillar Coral

Pillar Coral Reef

(15-25 feet) The abundance of pillar coral is what gave this reef its name. Home to a wide variety of marine life from angel fish to eels and turtles, if you venture out into the sand just off the reef you will find more queen conch shells than you can count.

Wreck of the Spiegel Grove

Diver Liability Release

One of the world’s largest ships ever sunk as an artificial reef in 2002. From bow to stern an immense 510’ laying upright in 135’ of water with a minimum depth of 55’. The Spiegel Grove is so large; it’s almost like an underwater city. Even the most experienced divers will need between 6 and 12 dives to become completely oriented. New coral growth, Goliath Groupers and the biggest arrow crabs you’ll ever see make this dive worth the wait!

Wreck of the USCG Duane

Snorkel Liability Release

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Duane was sunk in 1987 for use as an artificial reef. She lies upright on a sandy bottom in 120 feet of water off Key Largo. The mast and crow’s nest, protruding high above the hull, can be seen at 60 feet. At 70 feet. The superstructure deck is at 90 feet and the main deck lies at l00 feet. The hull structure, completely intact with the original rudders, screws, railings, ladders and ports makes an impressive display. Her upright position makes for an excellent multi-level deep wreck dive.

Wreck of the Eagle

Critter Feed Liability Release

Sunk in 1985 for use as an artificial reef The Eagle, a 287' conventional-hull freighter, has become the home to many different specie: schools of tarpon and jacks, an occasional turtle and thousands of bait fish. She lays on her starboard side. The wreck begins at 76 feet and drops to the sand at 112 feet. In 1998, Hurricane Georges blew through Islamorada and tore the ship in half. A distance of about 100 feet now separates the two halves. Inside the hull live 2 huge Goliath Groupers (Volkswagen size) definitely a must see!